Horror Movies ( Splatter, Cheese, Exploitation, Mainstream )

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Offline SM666

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« on: April 06, 2013, 05:01:27 PM »
Half my library of Dvd's & Blu-rays is Horror movies. I love the genre and it pretty much led me to all the real life gore stuff. So any new's, movie trailers, recommendations, reviews, thoughts or general shit on the horror genre i will be bringing it here. Or anybody for that matter, all is welcome. Now i'm no expert but i have seen my fair share & more. Plus this place doesn't have a horror movie thread until now. :flick:


Will start off with a little splatter film from Italy i recently just saw....






« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 05:16:44 PM by SicMonster666 »
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2013, 05:40:22 PM »
Looks pretty cool.


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Offline DeathsDoor

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« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2013, 05:47:35 PM »
Looks pretty cool.



Looks good to me! id have some of that.
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2013, 05:47:51 PM »
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« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2013, 05:50:23 PM »
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« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2013, 05:57:35 PM »
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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2013, 06:06:04 PM »
A little short film i found.


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« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2013, 06:24:27 PM »
 Apocalypse of the Dead is actually a 2009 Serbian film released under the name Zone of the Dead; the first Serbian zombie movie ever. Its main attraction is Dawn of the Dead actor Ken Foree once again battling zombies in the lead role (heís also credited as an associate producer). None of these factors give a good impression of the filmís quality and would fill even the strongest zombie fan with bargain bin dread. But, somehow, the movie isnít all that bad. There are some parts that donít succeed, but overall Apocalypse of the Dead is charming and fun.
The writing is actually decent. The story flows smoothly from one group of survivors to the next with no trouble and immediately establishes clear voices for all the major players. Characters have a bit of meat to them, there are some good lines, and all the plot threads come together in a ludicrously violent finale. The movie shifts tonally to an action film in the finale, but it works by embracing some over the top violence. Once you see a religious crusader mow down zombie children with twin sub machine guns, the movie goes for some absurd action humor. There are some political elements that surface later in the film that might be unfamiliar to non-Serbians and those who donít know the regionís history, but it doesnít stop the fun one bit.
Thereís certainly some Romero influence in here and a few homages to Romeroís work with Ken Foree on Dawn of the Dead. Foree utters a line thatís very close to his famous one from the Romero zombie movie, making it the third time heís had to say something on film about a lack of room in Hell. The survivors even discuss the possibility of seeking shelter in a shopping mall, only for Foree to tell them that he knows the dead would still get in. The references walk the line between cute fan service and annoying pleas for fan love, but they still earn a laugh.
The zombies are all Romero, but you can also see John Carpenterís influence on directors Milan Konjević and Milan Todorović. Apocalypse of the Dead becomes that kind of Howard Hawks-like siege movie that Carpenter has made time and time again. The scenario for the movie is highly reminiscent of Assault on Precinct 13, with the survivors seeking shelter in an abandon police station. The film focuses on the conflict between people from various backgrounds and a faceless, homogenized horde. Everyone gets to have a character moment while securing entrances and fighting off the undead. The Interpol agents and the unnamed prisoner earn a begrudging respect for one another over the course of the film. These familiar tropes are part of why the movie works despite limits in cast and production value.
On a technical level, Apocalypse of the Dead is mostly successful. The action is handled very well for a pair of first time directors. Everything is framed nicely and the camera only has a few missteps. There are lots of shaky cam angels which never hinder the clarity of the action but do get annoying after a while. The gore and makeup effects are great. The zombies have a lot of detail in their graying, decaying skin. There some issues with the audio and dubbed dialogue, but it makes the movie fun in a bad.
The cast has some good choices and a few minor misses. Ken Foree and Kristina Klebe both flesh out their characters of Agent Mortimer Reyes and Agent Mina Milius respectively. Their body language and line delivery illuminate the layers in each character. Itís Emilio Roso as the unnamed prisoner who really seems to be having fun. Heís got good comedic timing that pulls of the scriptís many one liners. The supporting and bit players for the most part arenít that great. Their delivery is usually stilted and unenthusiastic, and the dubbed performers sound awkward. Again, this is nothing that canít be seen as some ďso bad itís goodĒ moments.
Apocalypse of the Dead is surprisingly entertaining and filled with genre love. Thereís good action, a good story, and a lot of reverence for the genre filmmakers who inspired this production. Itís definitely a good first outing for the directors and for Serbian zombie movies.


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Offline Saltydog

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« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2013, 06:27:10 PM »
Looks pretty cool.




Is this a remake of the 2010 version? Can't be.
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« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2013, 06:32:51 PM »



While Halloween and Friday the 13th took the world by storm, William Lustigís 1980 Maniac never received the same attention as the aforementioned slashers, but definitely helped pave the way for A Nightmare on Elm Street and as well as its own line of various copycats. Maniac was quite simply forgotten (except among us hardcore horror nuts), which is why the idea of remaking it for name value never made any sense. Yet, to my surprise, Alex Aja and producing/writing partner Grťgory Levasseur actually had something to say. Thereís a purpose for this remake, and the execution propels it into becoming a modern horror classic.
The premise is basically the same except the psychotic Frank, played by Joe Spinell in the original, is replaced by a younger and more sympathetic Elijah Wood. Frank, in the 2012 version, collects and restores mannequins. On the surface everything is normal as he attempts to keep it together, but his tormented past turns him from Dr. Jekyll to Mr. Hyde in a flash. He stalks and murders women, and then returns to his secret room plastered with mannequins dressed up like each victim. And like the original, he collects their scalps, which are then stapled onto the mannequinís heads as trophies.
The modern spin is that Franck Khalfoun, who directed the horrendous P2 for Aja and Levasseur, shoots everything from Woodís perspective. Itís NOT found footage, but itís directed as such. The audience embodies Frankís everyday life, which makes for quite a gut-punching experience. And while this concept is nothing new (Enter the Void recently did this), itís a refreshing take on the slasher genre that makes the viewer literally become the killer (itís a bit like the original Friday the 13th when Pamela Voorhees stalks in the shadows). The first person perspective validates the remake and sets the table for some extremely compelling performances.
  The acting really glues everything together. Wood is an oddly sympathetic character and many of the victims are so incredibly well cast that it emotionally stings a bit when they die. Nora Arnezeder plays the female lead, Anna, a mannequin photographer who crosses paths with Frank when she passes by his store and sees his work on display. Sheís such a likable character that itís painful watching as sheís being led like a lamb to the slaughter.
   Speaking of slaughter.
Maniac goes from 0-60 in the blink of an eye as it opens with a shocking kill that will have horror fans salivating for more. At first it feels as mean spirited as the original, but eventually it transforms into a visionary slasher that somehow manages to balance emotion with splatter. The original goes for shock value while Khalfounís remake goes for dirty realism (which is nailed home when Frank continually uses bug spray to kill all the flies caused by the rotting flesh). At no point does Khalfoun pull back; every kill is fierce and brutal and the camera never looks away when a victim is being scalped (obviously, this is because Frank wouldnít be looking away, but Khalfoun could have chosen to edit it down).
Itís such an interesting parallel that Lustigís 1980 Maniac set the stage for hundreds of slasher copycats and now, here in 2012, Khalfoun is doing the same thing with his remake. Again, itís not for the faint of heart and I expect mainstream critics to scoff at it, but theyíll eventually be proven wrong. Relish in knowing that the new Maniac is a horror film that our community will own and cherish for years to come.

« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 06:35:32 PM by SicMonster666 »
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« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2013, 06:36:44 PM »
Looks pretty cool.




Is this a remake of the 2010 version? Can't be.
Good Question, don't know. Just looked it up on Imdb, no remake. Same film from 2010.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 06:40:17 PM by SicMonster666 »
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« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2013, 06:55:12 PM »



The rape and revenge subgenre has always been controversial for displaying acts of sexualized violence on screen. However, the subgenre, when done well, works to open up discussion of rape culture, and to reverse the gaze from survivor to rapist. American Mary offers a daring new take on rape and revenge and body horror cinema that does not limit its scope to sex and murder. Writers and directors, Jen and Sylvia Soska examine the life of a girl who has worked toward something all her life, only to have her dreams shattered one after the other. Mary uses the wrongs that have be brought upon her to fuel her own twisted American dream. American Mary is a bold, refreshing, and emotive horror flick that showcases the potential of the Soska Twins.
[/size]While their first feature, Dead Hooker in a Trunk, was all kinds of fun, American Mary is a vast improvement that switches from kitsch to clever, forcing the audience to actually feel. Katherine Isabelle (Ginger Snaps) plays Mary, an intelligent, funny, awkward, sexy, and scary medical student struggling to make ends meet. Isabelleís performance is instantly captivating as the perfect girl next door. But when sheís offered a healthy sum of $5000 to sew up a back-alley crime victim, a little part of her deteriorates, and it all slides downhill from there.
[/size]Word gets out that Mary is in the game of performing underground operations, and a Betty Boop imitator hires her to de-sexualize her Barbie Doll friend. The much-needed emotional attachment to the lead is tough to find in modern horror, but Mary is the ideal girl next door who you canít help but love despite her moral ambiguity. Mary realizes her potential as a surgeon, and though her ethics are compromised, she makes the money she needs to get through med school by performing seedy plastic surgeries.
[/size]All is coming up bloody roses until Mary becomes the victim of a particularly nasty sexual assault. It is not a particularly violent rape, but the Soska Twins show the despair in Maryís eyes, adding to the emotional weight of the scene. After this heinous act, Mary is gone. All the events lead up to her metamorphosis, where she transforms from hero to monster. The film brilliantly combines the idea of the final girl with the killer, making for one fierce female anti-hero. She may be the girl of your dreams, but cross her, and sheíll surgically remove your arms and sew your eyelids shut.
[/size]Rather than forcing gore in the face of the audience, the Soska Twins utilizes the bloodshed to challenge the audienceís views on transformative surgery. The film fits within the strange Canadian medical body horror category with films like Dead Ringers and the recent Antiviral. However, American Mary differentiates itself by exploring body modification as a form of artistic expression.
[/size]American Mary is far from a perfect film. The male lead is weak and his on-screen chemistry with Katherine Isabelle is off, in large due to some awkward dialog. The latter half of the film is weaker than the build up, as itís a bit difficult to believe Mary could undergo such a big transformation in so little time. Thereís one particular scene of Mary threatening a stripper in the bathroom stall of her favorite seedy hangout, which is simply out of character. The film loses some steam as it heads into the final act, but luckily, the climax ascends and Isabelleís performance carries the film through the rough patches.
[/size]The Soska Twins have come a long way since Dead Hooker, and American Mary is huge leap forward in their career as filmmakers. Paying tribute to body horror and rape and revenge cinema, the Soska Twins have created a film thatís bound to make audiences feel for their devil of a protagonist. Despite its flaws, this is a film that shines a light on Canadian cinema, offering hope that there is still originality to be found in horror.
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Offline SM666

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« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2013, 07:51:29 PM »



While nearly everything has already been done before, what separates a good filmmaker from a great one is whether or not they can take an old plot and put a fresh spin on it. Director Sean Byrne did just that with The Loved Ones, his hyper-realistic horror thriller that is a crossbreed of Wolf Creek, Otis and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (maybeSpider Baby would be more relevant).
     In the film, also scripted by Byrne, Brent (Xavier Samuel), a 17-year-old student, still grieving for his father, declines an invitation to the school formal from Lola (Robin McLeavy), the quietest girl in school. When Lola and her father kidnap Brent, he must fight to survive the macabre celebration they have in store for him.
    While this plot is tired, old and quite simply trite, Byrne engages the audience with his deep character exploration, which is the driving for of the film. He takes the time to introduce us to Brentís world as we meet his girlfriend desperate for his love, his best friend lacking self-esteem who manages to get the girl of his dreams to go to the dance with him, and even spend some time with his mother. The audience is taken on a journey of everyone is Brentís life, all of whom play a major role in rounding out the finale of the film. More impressive is the contrasting story that begins immediately when Brent is taken hostage by the psychopath Lola and her father. While Brent is tied to a chair and forced to a family dinner with Lola, his friend is picking up his hot date for the dance. When Brent is getting a knife hammered into his foot, his friend is drinking and smoking pot with his chick. And when sh*t really hits the fan for Brent, his friend is getting the backseat dream-f*ck of his life. Itís a brilliant parallel thatís intensely engaging on both fronts, and while one will have you on the edge of your seat, the other had you rooting for the awkward kid that might remind you of yourself when you were 16.
    But the stroke of real genius comes when Byrne turns the switch up to 10 and throws a curve ball. While it could be expected, this plot turn is delivered in such a way that the audience shouldnít really be trying to think ahead (one of the biggest flaws in a horror fan). Byrne does such a good job of keeping you engaged that you should only be worried about the present, and not the future. And itís quite poetic what the title really means Ė I think my response was something along the lines of ďoh f*ck yeah!Ē
   While Loved Ones does have a few scene of torture, itís really not about that and never is it the focus of the film. Yes, itís bloody and quite violent, but again, itís just not about that. Itís about the whole picture and how everything ties together.
    Iím digging on this new breed of subgenre, which is brutal, uncompromising and hyper-realistic. Carried by strong performances (by everyone) and stunning cinematography by Simon Chapman, The Loved Ones is a beautiful, fresh and engaging horror film thatís a must see.

« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 07:54:17 PM by SicMonster666 »
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« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2013, 11:24:01 PM »



Director Jon Hewitt, who has plenty of experience in the genre, has returned with a new dark thriller, ACOLYTES, which follows a group of teens who blackmail a serial killer.
    The logline might look simple, but SP Krause, Jon Hewitt and Shayne Armstrongís screenplay is pretty complex, which is the films only real downfall. What ACOLYTES really comes down to is HOW and WHY the three teens end up blackmailing the serial killer. The film delves into the psyche of a teenager and tries to construct a scenario that is not only interesting, but also believable. The end result is something overly complex, when it didnít need to be. But itís still hard to fault the film for these flaws considering how well developed the characters are and how interesting the scenarios get. If there was a middle ground to be found this might have been superior Ė and I stress the word might.
     Like previously mentioned, itís really hard to frown on the film for being overly complex, considering how filled out the movie is. Thereís not a dull moment as the screenplay is very well written, suspenseful, sexy and smart Ė all of which are accented by the superb directing, cinematography and acting.
     Filled with a bunch of freshman actors, Hewitt handles them with ease and transforms what could have been disastrous performances into some that are quite riveting. Other than the over-the-top story, these kids bring a high level of believability to a film that needs it more than anything. The acting in a film of this magnitude is the glue that holds the entire picture together Ė it never loosens for a second in ACOLYTES.
     If there were a film to compare this to it would be both this yearís DEADGIRL and previous Midnight Madness entry ALL THE BOYS LOVE MANDY LANE. Thereís a distinct look to the film that seems to be the new cool these days. Itís cold, dark, gritty and also looks extremely expensive. The cinematography is stunning and helps keep the audience on the edge of their seat through the entire thriller. Hewitt also brings out his artistic side by creating captivating opening credits, while during an intricate point later in the film, he uses a mesmerizing strobe effect to create a high level of suspense. Without a shadow of doubt, this is the work of a seasoned director.
     Overall, ACOLYTES is a superb film that deserves a lot of respect. It shows a high level of competence in the directing styles of Jon Hewitt, while the experience of his previous works have proven to have helped him build into a soon-to-be famous director. .Consider this film a huge success and accomplishment and make sure to check it out as soon as you can, it wonít disappoint.


I have this movie and i thought it was very good, would recommend it.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 11:25:35 PM by SicMonster666 »
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« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2013, 11:31:43 PM »



Nacho Cerdaís short film, Aftermath, is definitely one of the most controversial films of the last couple of decades. Its ruthless and realistic depiction of grisly autopsies and a sinister surgeon with an inclination towards violent necrophilia has some of the hardest scenes to stomach in any horror movie, period. Unearthed Films has recently released this underground classic with its two siblings, The Awakening Ė a black and white student film from Cerdaís days at USC, and Genesis Ė the third installment which rounds out the directorís self-proclaimed trilogy of death.
     While the other two films are excellent in their own right, it is Aftermath which has sponged all the attention and garnered Cerda all the notorious acclaim. The paradox with Aftermath is how beautiful the film actually is Ė in that, while it is very striking, it is really hard to draw any artistic merit out of it based on its content alone. It was the first short film to be shot on digital in Spain (on 35mm), giving the movie a haunting and raw appearance. The director did some hands-on research, visiting some autopsy labs and going through some full-on, grisly dissections with real forensic experts and this truly shines through in the final product. Coupled with some extremely realistic corpses and shooting it in an authentic morgue makes for an exceptionally nauseating experience. I mean this in the best possible sense, of course! It is merciless in itís every graphic, stomach-churning aspect, and highlights the depths of depravity which humanity can, and will, go.
       Letís quickly address the first film in the trilogy, The Awakening. It is a very short, dreamy film about a student who has an out-of-body experience after staring at the pyramid on the American dollar bill. While itís obviously an amateur project, you can begin to see some of Cerdaís themes unfold, like his focus on the afterlife and religious iconography which show up in his later work. I wonít give it a rating here, as itís not really fair, and is essentially added as an extra to Unearthedís DVD.
     The second is, of course, Aftermath. It stars an astonishingly menacing Pep Tosar (a Spanish stage actor), as the lead surgeon with a decidedly unhealthy necrophilia fetish. At least he is in the right line of work (insert nervous laugh here)! The film begins with Tosar and another forensic surgeon giving a couple of routine, yet gruesome, autopsies. Once our lead is left alone, however, the fun really begins as he pulls out a recently deceased female and acts out some seriously bizarre fantasies!
     Genesis, the final film of the pack, is quite frankly the best of the three. It involves a sculptor whose wife has recently died tragically. In order to preserve her memory, he sculpts a likeness of her in stone. As he nears completion of the statue, strange things being to happen to him. His body changes dramatically and the closer he gets to finishing, the more drastic the changes become.
     There are some intriguing and incredibly fascinating aspects to both of Cerdaís shorts. In neither is there any dialogue. Not a word! Itís remarkable, actually. Although both involve solitary males in confined spaces, this tactic really makes you focus on the nuances of the actors and their interaction with their surroundings. You can draw so much more with your imagination as a player in the game, and it really does give credence to the old adage, Ďa picture is worth a thousand words.í
     The photography is simplistic, and the color palate is pale and drab. In Aftermath, boring and sterile blues meld in with the metallic equipment and pallid walls. You will be astonished at how much more you experience the bright crimson blood set against this, and how much more horrifying it suddenly becomes. Also, the sterility and confinement of the awful rape scenes make it seem that much more claustrophobic and disturbingly convincing. In Genesis, the sculptorís stone grays mimic the gloomy emotion of his loss, and change to the colors of flesh and blood to emulate his ongoing transformation.
     The acting is flawless in both accounts, and because there is no dialogue this aspect is the most crucial. Most notable is the aforementioned Pep Tosar, who literally defines sinister. Acting with only his eyes, set above his surgeonís mask, he runs the gamut of emotions, and when the last scenes are playing out it he is exceptionally frightening. There are very few other examples of acting more terrifying that I can think of in the entire horror genre. He is that good, trust me!
     Finally, I must dote on Genesis for a second. This is a truly breathtaking film, and much easier to define and enjoy than its evil twin brother, Aftermath. I will be honest in saying it is the closest thing to visual poetry that I have ever witnessed, and is absolutely one of the finest short films I have ever seen. I was not expecting this after the other two films, and I must say it left a great impression on me. It is a complete emotional and visual work of genius.
    To end, a word of warning: this DVD is not for everyone. Aftermath is often intensely shocking due to its uncomfortable closeness to reality and the ruthless themes which are presented. On the whole, and in my opinion, the two shorts are near-masterpieces of filmmaking. I understand that this is a tough sentiment to justify due to the content, and I wonít blame you if you are entirely repulsed. It is powerful and graphic and unless you have a strong stomach, please avoid! Anyone of you disturbed enough to take a chance, however, will not be disappointed and I strongly encourage you to seek this out. Itís undeniably the crŤme of the macabre crop!


And here's the Uncut Full Movie

« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 11:35:05 PM by SicMonster666 »
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