World's rarest animals are caught on hidden camera exploring their habitats

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Offline scooped away

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« on: May 22, 2013, 08:33:50 PM »
They may be some of the world's most  endangered animals, but caught on secret camera this colourful menagerie appear  not to have a care in the world.

The giant panda, red panda, Tibetan  stump-tailed macaque, takin and leopard are all regarded as endangered by the  WWF.

So to gain a better understanding of them,  the wildlife charity set up a dozen camera traps in the mountainous giant panda  reserves of the Sichuan Province in China.
Strike a pose: A golden pheasant photographed by WWF using camera traps for International Day for Biodiversity Strike a pose: A golden pheasant photographed by WWF  using camera traps for International Day for BiodiversityLooking around: A giant panda explores its territory as it wanders through the snow Looking around: A giant panda explores its territory as  it wanders through the snowA giant panda photographed by WWF using camera traps Panda Realistic: The benefit of camera traps is that there is  practically zero human interference which helps give scientists a more accurate  idea of how the species behave in the wildSay cheese: A tufted deer looks a bit shocked to be caught out by the WWF cameras Say cheese: A tufted deer looks a bit shocked to be  caught out by the WWF camerasIt is believed by setting up special  conservation areas for the giant panda - China's national animal - other  endangered animals within the same natural habitat will also be  protected.
The WWF released the images yesterday to mark  the International Day for Biological Diversity.

In the pictures, the likes of giant pandas,  red pandas, golden pheasants and Tibetan stump-tailed macaques are all seen  wandering around the wild terrain.

The benefit of camera traps is that there is  practically zero human interference which helps give scientists a more accurate  idea of how the species behave in the wild.
Hang on right: A red panda photographed by WWF using camera traps Hang on right: A red panda photographed by WWF using  camera traps Exploring: An inquisitive Tibetan stump-tailed macaque gets a close-up Exploring: An inquisitive Tibetan stump-tailed macaque  gets a close-upEndangered: The giant panda, red panda, Tibetan stump-tailed macaque, takin and leopard are all regarded as endangered by the WWF Endangered: The giant panda, red panda, Tibetan  stump-tailed macaque, takin and leopard are all regarded as endangered by the  WWFLooking docile: An Asiatic black bear. The WWF released the images todau to mark the International Day for Biological Diversity Looking docile: An Asiatic black bear. The WWF released  the images todau to mark the International Day for Biological  DiversityCaught on camera: A leopard takes a midnight stroll Caught on camera: A leopard takes a midnight stroll  Having a look around: A pair of Takins explore a snowy terrain Having a look around: A pair of Takins explore a snowy  terrain More than 100 infrared camera traps were  placed in six nature reserves by WWF and its partners from the local forestry  authority as part of the monitoring effort under the giant panda conservation  programme.

The WWF says its conservation officers have  gained a better understanding of the identification of animal traces and areas  of their activities.

Fan Zhiyong, director of WWF species  programme in China, said: 'The images demonstrate that through the conservation  of the giant panda, a flagship umbrella species, we can also protect other  threatened wildlife from the same habitat and preserve biological  diversity.'Jiang Zeyin, species  programme officer at  WWF China, added: 'The multimedia materials are  obtained under circumstances  where there was little external disturbance and therefore they truly reflect the  conditions of those species in the wild.'
There are more than 6,500 species of  vertebrates in China, representing 14  per cent of the global total - making it  one of 12 globally recognised  'mega diversity' countries.

However, because of habitat loss and human  development, the overall biodiversity in China is in decline, despite  improvements in some places.

The population of more than ten flagship  species in China, which include  Amur tigers, musk deer and the Yangtze finless  porpoise, are among a  number of creatures which have undergone a marked  decline.
Protection: It is believed by setting up special conservation areas for the giant panda - China's national animal - other endangered animals within the same natural habitat will also be protected Protection: It is believed by setting up special  conservation areas for the giant panda - China's national animal - other  endangered animals within the same natural habitat will also be  protectedBashful: A red panda is caught on camera as it creeps out of shot Bashful: A red panda is caught on camera as it creeps  out of shotRare: A blue eared pheasant was caught on by more 100 infrared camera traps were placed in six nature reserves by WWF A Temminck's tragopan Rare: A blue eared pheasant was caught by more 100  infrared camera traps which were placed in six nature reserves by WWF - they  also caught, right, Temminck's tragopan 
Panda Diverse: A wild boar. There are more than 6,500 species  of vertebrates in China, representing 14 per cent of the global total - making  it one of 12 globally recognised 'mega diversity' countriesA goral photographed by WWF using camera traps A forest musk deer. A goral photographed by WWF using camera traps , left  and a forest musk deer right both make an appearance
A red fox skulks. Improvements: A red fox skulks. Because of habitat loss  and human development, the overall biodiversity in China is in decline, despite  improvements in some placesExploration: A yellow-throated marten explores the bark of a tree Exploration: A yellow-throated marten explores the bark  of a tree A Sambar A Sambar stands proud. The WWF says its conservation  officers have gained a better understanding of the identification of animal  traces and areas of their activitiesMoving on: A group of Takin move on from where they have been resting Moving on: A group of Takin move on from where they have  been resting and caught on camera

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2329064/Strike-pose-Worlds-rarest-animals-caught-hidden-camera-exploring-habitats.html#ixzz2U3GtrLLb
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Offline bonajazz

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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2013, 08:40:34 PM »
Thanks for posting the animals...
Redheads make my world go 'round...

Offline DeathsDoor

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« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2013, 08:40:57 PM »
Get a bad deal here.. foxes that is. Shame thou.
A red fox skulks.
I tried to commit suicide one time...

I won't be trying that again I nearly fucking died.